Best rap albums of all time

Music is the beautiful communication of vibrations in space, as perceived by our ears and interpreted by our brains, and the ultimate aural expression of our existential experience of life. In the words of E.T.A. Hoffman, “Music discloses to man an unknown realm, a world in which he leaves behind him all definite feelings to surrender himself to an inexpressible longing.”

You did it! It took months of hard work to plan your tour and, despite the inevitable bumps along the road, it was most definitely a worthwhile experience.

Your engagement metrics will tell you which efforts are getting the most attention on a weekly basis, and how that’s changed over time from a macro perspective. What this means is, you can easily see where you’re getting the most interaction and focus in any particular space, and how images or videos two years ago for example stack up with those posted more recently.

Music unites location

“Wait, we’re musicians, we don’t write agendas.” Ok, but that’s a great way to ensure you don’t get anything done. Being a good musician sometimes requires a little business sense, and I’ve found a clear agenda can really help. Knowing exactly what order we’re going to record in can make the whole thing so much smoother and more efficient. And laying it out a week in advance gives your bandmates and engineer a chance to prepare, make suggestions, or consider alternate approaches.

Alex is a multi-instrumentalist, composer and producer from Sydney, Australia. He founded the post-rock band sleepmakeswaves, with which he has toured Asia, America, Europe and Australia. In his spare time he writes music for short films, produces bands and subsists on altogether too much coffee. Alex is the instructor of the free Soundfly course, Live Clicks and Backing Tracks.

The main thing I have students do in music tech class is make original music and lots of it. So the question immediately becomes, how do I even begin to objectively assess that stuff?

Soundfly welcomes new voices each month to offer unique perspectives, shine a light on unexpected musical worlds, and help our readers find their sound.

“I worked with Jeff in earlier sessions of Introduction to the Composer’s Craft and the Headliners Club. He has a beautiful perspective and really seems to look at his music from multiple angles. In addition to writing music, Jeff is a gifted photographer, and that comes through when you listen to his work. In the composition course, we discussed the foundations of writing music — things like form, tonality, etc., and then went on to develop his artistic voice during a follow-up session of the Headliners Club.

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Tredici Bacci’s new album, La Fine Del Futuro, is out now via NNA Tapes. And if you’re in New York City, Simon Hanes and Tredici Bacci will be presenting new work on June 26 at National Sawdust. More info here.

The six-week mentored course shows students how to transcend tired harmonic clichés to build more nuanced, interesting chord progressions, how to use concepts like modal interchange, secondary dominants, dissonance, and chromaticism, and how to bring a “jazzy” sense of harmony to one’s music. By the end, participants overwhelmingly feel more comfortable crafting sophisticated chord progressions to imbue more nuanced emotions in their music.

So far, we’ve kept to pretty mainstream pop tunes, but when we start to move away from those, things can get murky pretty quickly. For instance, while verses and choruses might be easy to recognize in a big pop anthem, how they function in an electronic dance song might not be as clear. Or how would you describe the form of something like “A Day in the Life” by The Beatles? It’s basically two entirely separate songs smashed together, so there’s no obvious “verse” or “chorus” section. Same thing with Travis Scott’s “Sicko Mode,” but for three songs’ worth!

It’s so easy nowadays to get caught up in what’s trendy, and in the age of independent artists being able to produce and release work on one’s own, it’s hard to stand out when there’s so much content available at our fingertips. But in the end, if you’re doing something that feels 200% authentic to you, confidence will follow. Clear and to the point, the legendary Aretha Franklin knows her stuff.

Learning to become an accomplished and knowledgeable audio engineer is an enormous undertaking. While we’re lucky to live in the age of the internet, where so much information is available for free, that information is not always presented in a form that allows us to make the best use of it. Spend time on YouTube, for example, and you’ll find a wealth of video content aimed at those who want to master the art of mixing, yet a lot of it is inaccurate, misleading, out of context and inapplicable, or simply incompatible with your own experience and what you’re attempting to do in the studio.